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Supporting extraordinary charities, helping children and young people

Book Aid International has been chosen as our new international charity partner.

hands reaching out

The charity, which provides a million books to libraries, schools, prisons, hospitals, universities and refugee camps in 25 countries each year, was chosen by Cambridge University Press & Assessment colleagues after a global selection process.

It will join three new, UK-based charity partners – Coventry’s Positive Youth Foundation, Centre 33 in Cambridgeshire, and the North East Autism Society – in benefiting from donations, colleague fundraising and match funding.

Colleagues will also lend their time, skills and expertise to support the charities in delivering their work, which aligns with our own purpose to help people across the world to realise their potential, benefiting society and the planet.

At Cambridge, we’re united in our ambition to support people in pursuing their potential through education and research. We are very proud to be partnering with these four extraordinary charities, whose goals are aligned with ours.

Peter Phillips, Chief Executive of Cambridge University Press & Assessment

Book Aid International was voted on by colleagues globally, who were invited to select a new international charity partner, operating near one or more of Cambridge University Press & Assessment’s regional offices. Meanwhile, all UK-based colleagues were invited to nominate charity partners in Cambridgeshire, Coventry and the North-East of England. 

Book Aid International’s work includes the Books to Go project, which will see primary schools in Kenya gifted lending libraries with 2,000 new storybooks, readers and chapter books, 200 book bags to take home, teacher training and a grant to purchase around 100 books locally. 

For Coventry, Cambridge University Press & Assessment will be supporting the Positive Youth Foundation, which helps to raise the aspirations and life chances of 8- to 25-year-olds. They run regular groups with girls and young women, looked after children and newly arrived refugees, helping those at risk of exclusion from school, offending or exploitation.

Centre 33 in Cambridgeshire provides free and confidential support to young people up to 25 with mental health, caring responsibilities, housing, sexual health and more. In partnering with Centre 33, Cambridge University Press & Assessment will help to fund the organisation’s support for the region’s young carers and its counselling in local schools, as well as the ‘Someone to Talk to’ service, which provides a lifeline for young people. 

The third partnership is with the North East Autism Society, which provides care and education for children, young people and adults and is dedicated to helping autistic young people fulfil their potential. Its 78-acre farm is used as a vocational training centre, a site for residential accommodation and to provide breaks for young people.

The main criterion for selection was ensuring that each charity had an educational focus, as well as being in line with Cambridge University Press & Assessment’s purpose.

This announcement comes on International Day of Charity, which was established to mobilise people around the world to support others through volunteering and philanthropic activities.

Peter Phillips, Chief Executive of Cambridge University Press & Assessment said:

"At Cambridge, we’re united in our ambition to support people in pursuing their potential through education and research. We are very proud to be partnering with these four extraordinary charities, whose goals are aligned with ours.

We are looking forward to helping all four organisations in the year ahead both through our fundraising activities and through offering our time and skills. I’m excited to see what we can achieve together."